Memphis ScStr - History

Memphis ScStr - History

Memphis ScStr

Memphis I
The first Memphis, a 5-gun screw steamer built as Mount Savage at Philadelphia in 1853, was chartered by the Navy as Memphis 13 September 1858 for the Expedition to Paraguay 1859 and purchased 26 May 1859. She was renamed Mystic( -t.v. ) 14 June 1859.


The ship was 239 feet (72.8 m) long, with a beam of 30򠿮t 2 inches (9.2 m) and a depth of 19 feet (5.8 m). She was powered by a 2-cylinder steam engine having cylinders of 46 inches (120਌m) diameter by 36 inches (91਌m) stroke. Rated at 200 nhp, it drove a single screw propeller, giving a speed of 11.5 knots (21.3 km/h). She was assessed at 1,091 GRT, 791 NRT. [1]

Memphis was built by William Denny and Brothers, Dumbarton, United Kingdom for Peter Denny and Thomas Begbie. She was launched on April 3, 1862. Her port of registry was London and the United Kingdom Official Number 44836 was allocated. [1]

Civil War service

Confederate blockade runner

Memphis — on her maiden voyage, while running the Union blockade of Confederate ports on June 23, 1862 — ran aground off Sullivan&aposs Island, South Carolina while attempting to enter Charleston harbor. Efficient work by Southern troops got her partially unloaded on the following day, and she was towed to safety by the steamships Etiwan and Marlon before Federal warships could hit her with shell fire. [2] They were kept at bay by gunfire from Fort Beauregard. [3] Memphis was captured by sidewheel gunboat USS Magnolia outbound from Charleston with a cargo of cotton on July 31, 1862, and purchased by the Union Navy from a prize court at New York City on September 4, 1862. [4]

Union blockade ship

Memphis was commissioned on October 4, 1862, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Pendleton G. Watmough in command. Assigned to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Memphis sailed for Charleston and began service on October 14 with the capture of British steamer Ouachita bound for Havana, Cuba. She continued patrol in 1862�. On January 4, 1863, she joined sidewheel steamer Quaker City in taking Confederate sloop Mercury with a cargo of turpentine for Nassau, Bahamas. On January 31, Confederate ironclads CSS Palmetto State and CSS Chicora made a dash out of Charleston Harbor into the midst of the blockading ships. Screw steamer Mercedita was rammed and disabled by Palmetto State while sidewheel steamer Keystone State was next attacked and left for Memphis to take in tow. The two rams then retired. [4]

By March of the following year, Memphis was operating in the North Edisto River. On March 6, 1864, Confederate torpedo boat CSS David attempted a run on the Union blockader. The spar torpedo struck Memphis &apos port quarter but did not explode. After her second torpedo misfired, David retreated upstream out of range of her foe&aposs heavy guns. Memphis, uninjured, continued her blockading duties to the end of the Civil War. [4]

Post-war

On May 6, 1867, Memphis was decommissioned, and sold to V. Brown & Co., at New York on May 8, 1869. [4] Renamed Mississippi, She was sold to William Weld & Co. of Boston, Massachusetts. [1] On May 12, 1869, she was reported to have been wrecked on Mauritius. [5] On 29 August 1871, she was reported to have been wrecked in the Hatteras Inlet during a hurricane. All on board were rescued. [6] She was on a voyage from New York to New Orleans, Louisiana. [7] Mississippi was sold c.1875 to Frederick Baker, Boston. In 1879, she was sold to H. Hastings & Co., Boston. Mississippi was sold in 1881 to Edward Lawrence, New York. She was sold in 1882 to the Oregon Improvement Co, Portland, Oregon. On May 13, 1883, when she was gutted by a dock fire at Seattle, Washington. [1]


Welcome to Backbeat Tours!

Our tours – the popular Memphis Mojo Tour, the Memphis Discovery Tour, the Ghost Tour, the Beale Street Tour, and the Historic Memphis Walking Tour – are the best way to experience one of the South's most beautiful and complicated cities: Memphis, Tennessee. Starting from the heart of the city at the intersection of Beale Street and the old Blues Highway, our tours fan out over the city’s many fabled historic districts and show you what Memphis is all about.

You can purchase a gift certificate for any of our future tours by clicking here. Gift certificates are good for all of our tours including the popular Memphis Bike Tour, returning in March, 2021. Gift certificates make great presents for family and friends or use them yourself: just choose the tour and the number of tickets, and decide later when to come - there's no expiration date. In the meantime, you'll be supporting a small, local business and helping us get through a really difficult time.

Founded by author and historian Bill Patton, Backbeat Tours has been showcasing our great city to people from all over the world since 2006. We’ve been featured in the New York Times, on CNN, the BBC, Irish TV, Japanese TV, and Fox 13 News, and in Forbes, USA Today, Southern Living, Memphis Magazine, and newspapers around the country. Come see us, and find out what all the talk is about!


Customers without an appointment may request an E-Ticket to virtually place themselves in line up to to two hours before arriving at a Driver Services Center when tickets are available.

E-Services

The following are available through e-Services:

  • New Tennessee Resident & New Driver License Application
  • Driver License or CDL Renewal
  • Driver License or CDL Duplicate
  • CDL Medical Certification Renewal
  • Change of Address
  • Schedule a Road Skills Test Appointment
  • Submit Reinstatement Documents
  • Pay Reinstatement Fees
  • Reissue After Reinstatement
  • Advance a GDL License
  • Driver License Practice Test
  • Driving History / MVR
  • Reprint Confirmation
  • Submit an Owner Operator Report
  • Manage Emergency Contacts

Driver Services Appointments

Expand the appointment type for the service needed and read the information and instructions carefully before continuing.

Driver Services Appointments are only avaialble at select Driver Services Centers.

Road Skills Test Appointment

Road skills test appointments MUST be made in the e-Services portal. To make an appointment, click the button below and enter the required driver information.

Knowledge Test Appointment

Customers can schedule an appointment for knowledge tests at select full-service Driver Services Center. Scheduling an appointment allows a customer to be served at a Driver Services Center on a specific day and time. To make a knowledge test appointment, select Knowledge Test Appointment for service type.

  • A valid email address and valid phone number are required to schedule an appointment.
  • First-time applicants should complete the Driver License Application before visiting the center. To complete the application in the e-Services portal, click here.
  • You should arrive at the Driver Services Center 15 minutes prior to your scheduled appointment time. If you are late to your appointment, it is subject to cancellation and we will make service available to you as a walk-in customer.
  • If you make an appointment, you do not need to request an E-Ticket.

Driver License and Real ID Appointment

Customers can now schedule an appointment for Driver Services at select Driver Services Center. Scheduling an appointment allows a customer to be served at a Driver Services Center on a specific day and time. To make a driver services appointment, select Driver License Appointment for service type.

Services eligible for Driver License Appointment:

  • REAL ID
  • Renewals - Driver License, CDL, ID, Permit, Handgun Carry Permit
  • Duplicates - Driver License, CDL, ID, Permit, Handgun Carry Permit
  • Handgun Carry Permit application
  • New or Returning Resident - Fill out Driver License application in the e-Services portal before arriving at a center.
  • Name Change
  • Identification License

Appointment information:

  • A valid email address and valid phone number are required to schedule an appointment.
  • You should arrive at the Driver Services Center 15 minutes prior to your scheduled appointment time. If you are late to your appointment, it is subject to cancellation and we will make service available to you as a walk-in customer.
  • If you make an appointment, you do not need to request an E-Ticket.

Reinstatement Appointment

Customers can now schedule an appointment for driver license reinstatement services at select Driver Services Center that offer reinstatement services. Scheduling an appointment allows a customer to be served at a Driver Services Center on a specific day and time. To schedule a reinstatement appointment, select Reinstatement Appointment for service type.

  • A valid email address and valid phone number are required to schedule an appointment.
  • You should arrive at the Driver Services Center 15 minutes prior to your scheduled appointment time. If you are late to your appointment, it is subject to cancellation and we will make service available to you as a walk-in customer.
  • If you make an appointment, you do not need to request an E-Ticket.

CDL Skills Test Appointment

At a Driver Services Center:

CDL skills tests can be scheduled for any of the Commercial Driver License Road Skills Test locations across the state by calling 615-502-4179 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. CST Monday through Friday.

At a certified third party program participant:

Click here to view a current list of certified CDL third party testing program participants. Testing should be scheduled directly through the certified CDL third party testing program participant using the information provided on the list. CDL skills tests administered by certified CDL third party program participants may include additional fees or costs for the skills tests.

Cancel or Reschedule an Appointment

If you have scheduled a Knowledge Test, Driver License, or Reinstatement appointment and need to cancel or reschedule, read the steps below and then click the button to get started. If you have scheduled a Road Skills Test and need to cancel or reschedule, click here.


The Peabody Memphis

With a style and tradition befitting one of Memphis' grandest, most legendary hotels, The Peabody Memphis offers a magnificent bridge between the "Blues City's" celebrated past and cosmopolitan present.

Known as the &ldquoSouth&rsquos Grand Hotel,&rdquo The Peabody is legendary for its charm, elegance, gracious hospitality and rich history. This Memphis icon, opened in 1869, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is world-famous for its five resident ducks, who march daily through the lobby at 11 a.m. and 5 p.m.

When you&rsquore ready to experience Memphis&rsquo most unique and distinctive hotel, The Peabody is waiting.


Access options

Buy single article

Instant access to the full article PDF.

Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout.

Subscribe to journal

Immediate online access to all issues from 2019. Subscription will auto renew annually.

Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout.


9 Facts About Elvis Presley's Graceland

In March 1957, when਎lvis Presley was a rising star looking for a properly grand home that could give him the privacy he needed, the 22-year-old singer purchased the sprawling property known as Graceland. Nowਊ National Historic Landmark, it is one of the most visited homes in America. 

Check out some of these interesting facts about the historic site.

1. Presley paid $102,500 for Graceland — an equivalent of about $924,000 today.

2. When Presley purchased Graceland, the property was just shy of 14 acres and a little over 10,000 square feet. Today, the mansion occupies over 17,500 square feet.

3. Graceland has five sets of stairs.

4. Graceland is one of the most-visited home in the United States, with more than 500,000 visitors annually. 

5. The original owners, the Moores, gave Graceland its name, in honor of Mrs. Moore&aposs aunt, Grace Toof.

6. Besides Presley&aposs love for fried peanut-butter-and-banana sandwiches, he insisted that there be cans of sauerkraut, fresh banana pudding and Doublemint gum stocked in the kitchen at all times.

7. Bruce Springsteen was one of many young men who trespassed onto Graceland in hopes of meeting The King. Unfortunately for him, Presley wasn&apost even home at the time of Springsteen&aposs daring (and illegal) act.

8. A portion of Graceland&aposs upstairs area is forbidden to the public. It was a private place where Presleyਏound solace from the outside world.

9. Because attempts were made to steal Presley&aposs਋ody from his gravesite in Forest Hill Cemetery, he, along with his mother Gladys, were reinterred at Graceland&aposs Meditation Garden in 1977.  


CASUAL DINING IN MEMPHIS

From the heart of our nation&rsquos music capital, Hard Rock Cafe Memphis offers fresh, delicious American cuisine from the city so loved it is mentioned in more than 1,000 commercially produced songs. For almost two decades, guests of Hard Rock Cafe Memphis have savored world-class flavors and experienced impeccable service. Our new location features brand new memorabilia from local legends, convenient valet parking, and our amazing scratch-recipe menu offering savory appetizers, Legendary® Burger, and premium drinks!

Making Culinary History in Memphis

The spirit of music is alive and well at Hard Rock Cafe Memphis. Enjoy freshly prepared American cuisine, made from scratch by the best chefs in the business. Enjoy flavorful salads, tempting side dishes, and culinary classics. Experience the difference of Hard Rock&rsquos service with our energetic, hardworking staff of music enthusiasts, ready to provide you with everything you need for the perfect dining experience.


"I've Been to the Mountaintop"

“We’ve got some difficult days ahead,” Martin Luther King, Jr., told an overflowing crowd in Memphis, Tennessee, on 3 April 1968, where the city’s sanitation workers were striking. “But it really doesn’t matter with me now, because I’ve been to the mountaintop … I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the Promised Land” (King, “I’ve Been,” 222–223). Less than 24 hours after these prophetic words, King was assassinated by James Earl Ray.

King had come to Memphis two times before to give aid to the Memphis Sanitation Workers’ Strike. On 18 March, he spoke at a rally before 15,000 people and vowed to return the following week to lead a march. James Lawson and King led a march on 28 March, which erupted in violence and was immediately called off. Against the advice of his colleagues in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, King returned to Memphis on 3 April 1968, seeking to restore nonviolence back to the movement in Memphis.

After arriving in Memphis, King was exhausted and had developed a sore throat and a slight fever. He asked Ralph Abernathy to take his place at that night’s scheduled mass meeting at Bishop Charles Mason Temple. As Abernathy took the podium he could sense the disappointment of the crowd, which had turned out in the hundreds to hear King speak. Abernathy called King at the hotel and convinced him to brave the bad weather and come down to the temple. When King arrived, the crowd gave him a standing ovation. After Abernathy introduced King, the 39-year-old leader took the podium and began to speak to the audience extemporaneously. “Something is happening in Memphis,” King said. “Something is happening in our world” (King, “ I’ve Been ,” 207). Surveying great times in history, including Egypt, the Roman Empire, the Renaissance, and the Civil War, King said he would “be happy” if God allowed him “to live just a few years in the second half of the twentieth century” (King, “ I’ve Been ,” 209).

As King recalled the events in Birmingham in 1963, he painted a bleak picture of the times, yet said this was the best time in which to live. As King concluded his speech, he began to reminiscence about his near fatal stabbing in September 1958. He exclaimed that he would have missed the emergence of the student sit-ins in 1960, the Freedom Rides in 1961, the Albany Movement in 1962, the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963, and the Selma to Montgomery March in 1965.

In a prophetic finale to his speech, King revealed that he was not afraid to die: “Like anybody, I would like to live a long life—longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will…. And so I’m happy tonight I’m not worried about anything I’m not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord” (King, “ I’ve Been ,” 222 – 223). Witnesses, including Abernathy, Andrew Young, and James Jordan said King had tears in his eyes as he took his seat. “This time it just seemed like he was just saying, ‘Goodbye, I hate to leave,’” Jordan supposed (Honey, 424). On 4 April, while King waited for a limousine to take him to dinner at Reverend Billy Kyles’ home, he was fatally shot on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.


Memphis, TN

Raw data sources: 18,000 local law enforcement agencies in the U.S.

Date(s) & Update Frequency: Reflects 2019 calendar year released from FBI in Sept. 2020 (latest available). Updated annually. Where is 2020 data?

Methodology: Our nationwide meta-analysis overcomes the issues inherent in any crime database, including non-reporting and reporting errors. This is possible by associating the 9.4 million reported crimes in the U.S, including over 2 million geocoded point locations…. Read more about Scout's Crime Data

With a crime rate of 81 per one thousand residents, Memphis has one of the highest crime rates in America compared to all communities of all sizes - from the smallest towns to the very largest cities. One's chance of becoming a victim of either violent or property crime here is one in 12. Within Tennessee, more than 99% of the communities have a lower crime rate than Memphis. In fact, after researching dangerous places to live, NeighborhoodScout found Memphis to be one of the top 100 most dangerous cities in the U.S.A.

Separately, it is always interesting and important to compare a city's crime rate with those of similarly sized communities - a fair comparison as larger cities tend to have more crime. NeighborhoodScout has done just that. With a population of 651,073, Memphis has a combined rate of violent and property crime that is very high compared to other places of similar population size. Regardless of whether Memphis does well or poorly compared to all other cities and towns in the US of all sizes, compared to places with a similar population, it fares badly. Few other communities of this size have a crime rate as high as Memphis.

Now let us turn to take a look at how Memphis does for violent crimes specifically, and then how it does for property crimes. This is important because the overall crime rate can be further illuminated by understanding if violent crime or property crimes (or both) are the major contributors to the general rate of crime in Memphis.

For Memphis, we found that the violent crime rate is one of the highest in the nation, across communities of all sizes (both large and small). Violent offenses tracked included rape, murder and non-negligent manslaughter, armed robbery, and aggravated assault, including assault with a deadly weapon. According to NeighborhoodScout's analysis of FBI reported crime data, your chance of becoming a victim of one of these crimes in Memphis is one in 53.

Significantly, based on the number of murders reported by the FBI and the number of residents living in the city, NeighborhoodScout's analysis shows that Memphis experiences one of the higher murder rates in the nation when compared with cities and towns for all sizes of population, from the largest to the smallest.

In addition, NeighborhoodScout found that a lot of the crime that takes place in Memphis is property crime. Property crimes that are tracked for this analysis are burglary, larceny over fifty dollars, motor vehicle theft, and arson. In Memphis, your chance of becoming a victim of a property crime is one in 16, which is a rate of 62 per one thousand population.

Importantly, we found that Memphis has one of the highest rates of motor vehicle theft in the nation according to our analysis of FBI crime data. This is compared to communities of all sizes, from the smallest to the largest. In fact, your chance of getting your car stolen if you live in Memphis is one in 150.