USS Jacob Jones (DD-130)

USS Jacob Jones (DD-130)

USS Jacob Jones (DD-130)

USS Jacob Jones (DD-130) was a Wickes class destroyer that was sunk by U-578 on 28 February 1942 leaving only 11 survivors.

The Jacob Jones was named after Jacob Jones, a US naval officer during the quasi-war with France, the war with Tripoli and the War of 1812.

The Jacob Jones was laid down at Camden, New Jersey, on 21 February 1918, launched on 20 November 1918 and commissioned on 20 October 1919. She was allocated to the Pacific fleet, and reached San Diego on 26 January 1920. She served on the California coast during the first half of 1920, taking part in anti-aircraft and gunnery exercises, before entering the reserve on 17 August. She returned to active duty as part of the Destroyer Force, Pacific Fleet, on 18 June 1921, but was decommissioned for a second time on 24 June 1922.

This period lasted until 1 May 1930, when she was recommissioned once again. Her first duty was to act as a plane guard for aircraft carriers, a role that took her from Mexico to Alaska. She took part in the 1930 battle fleet manoeuvres in August, and then entered Mare Island Navy Yard for repairs that lasted from November 1930 until the end of January 1931. She then moved to Panama to act as plane guard for the USS Langley (CV-1). On 22 March she passed through the Panama Canal to take part in manoeuvres in the Caribbean. She then moved to the US East Coast, and took part in exercises in Chesepaeke Bay in late May. After that the Jacob Jones joined the Badger, Babbitt, Tattnall and Twiggs in Destroyer Division 7, Destroyer Squadron 3, Destroyer Flotilla 1, Scouting Force.

After another period in the dockyard she resumed her plane guard duties in February 1932, performing that role in March 1933. She then took part in more exercises at Guantanamo Bay in May 1933. She spent most of the next year and a half carrying out a variety of training exercises from Guantanamo Bay. She also escorted President Roosevelt during his 1934 'Good Neighbor' visit to Haiti.

In May 1935 the Jacob Jones took part in the summer midshipman cruise for the Naval Academy. This was followed by three months of coastal patrols, then manoeuvres off New York, before she entered Brooklyn Navy Yard for more work.

In June-September 1936 the Jacob Jones took part in reserve officer training cruises to the Caribbean. In October she took part in Army-Navy coastal manoeuvres In February 1937 she took part in minesweeping training. In March she was used to train officers from the 5th Fleet Reserve. In June she carried out another midshipmen training cruiser. She continued with reserve officer training until January 1938, then took part in fleet landing exercises and battle manoeuvres

In June 1937 she began another period as a plane guard as well as taking part in torpedo and gunnery practice.

The peace time atmosphere began to fade during 1937. In October she departed from Norfolk to join Squadron 40-T, the small fleet protecting American interests during the Spanish Civil War. She was based at Villefranche on the French Mediterranean coast from 17 November until 20 March 1939. She then carried out a good will cruise around the Mediterranean and the Atlantic Coast, visiting Algiers, Lisbon and Rotterdam and other ports. She then returned to the United States in October 1939 where she returned to plane guarding and coastal patrol duties.

In April 1940 the Jacob Jones joined the Neutrality Patrol, but she only served with the patrol for two months, before in June she returned to midshipman training.

In September 1940 the Jacob Jones moved to Norfolk for anti-submarine training, in particular with sonar.

1941

In March 1941 the Jacob Jones returned to the Neutrality Patrol, this time operating between Key West and the Yucatan Channel. In May she joined the force watching the Vichy-French islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe. This task lasted into September when she was allocated to Destroyer Division 54 in the North Atlantic. She joined her new unit at Argentia, Newfoundland, in mid December. Her first mission saw her escort the submarines USS Mackerel (SS-204) and S-33 (S-138) to Boston.

1942

On 4 January 1942 the Jacob Jones departed from Argentia escorting Albatross (AM-71) and Linnet (AM-76). Her task was to escort them to Convoy SC-63, heading across the Atlantic to Britain. During this mission she detected something on sonar and attacked with depth charges, but without success. She completed her mission and was back at Argentia on 5 January.

On 14 January 1942 the Jacob Jones left Argentia to help escort Convoy HX-169 to Iceland. She was separated from the convoy in a storm and had to make her own way to Iceland, arriving on 19 January.

On 24 January she departed from Iceland with three merchant ships heading for Argentia. Once again the convoy was scattered by bad weather, but the Jacob Jones did remain in contact with one of the three ships. She also carried out a second attack on a possible U-boat, on 2 February 1942.

On 4 February she left Argentia to escort Convoy ON-59 on its way to Boston, arriving on 8 February. She was then allocated to a new Anti-Submarine patrol that had been established in an attempt to reduce the heavy losses being suffered off the US east coast. This duty began on 22 February, and began with a prolonged but unsuccessful attack on a possible submarine. She then had to return to base to re-arm, leaving New York once again on 27 February to patrol the New Jersey coast. On 27 February she found the wreckage of the tanker R.P. Resor , and spent two hours searching for survivors.

At first light on 28 February the Jacob Jones was hit by two or three torpedoes fired by U-578. The magazine probably exploded after the first hit, and everything in front of the impact was broken off. The bridge, chart room and officers quarters. The second torpedo hit 40 ft from the fantail,a and destroyed the rear of the ship, leaving the midships section and 25-30 survivors. The remaining part of the ship stayed afloat for 45 minutes, allowing the survivors to get onto rafts, but when she did sink her depth charges exploding, killing some of the survivors.

The rafts were spotted by an Army observation aircraft at 0810, and twelve survivors were picked up by Eagle 56 of the Inshore Patrol. One of these men died before reaching shore leaving only eleven survivors. The eleven survivors were made up of nine engine room ratings and two apprentice seamen.

Displacement (standard)

1,160t (design)

Displacement (loaded)

Top Speed

35kts (design)
35.34kts at 24,610shp at 1,149t on trial (Wickes)

Engine

2 shaft Parsons turbines
4 boilers
24,200shp (design)

Range

3,800nm at 15kts on trial (Wickes)
2,850nm at 20kts on trial (Wickes)

Armour - belt

- deck

Length

314ft 4in

Width

30ft 11in

Armaments (as built)

Four 4in/50 guns
Twelve 21in torpedoes in four triple tubes
Two depth charge tracks

Crew complement

114

Laid Down

21 February 1918

Launched

20 November 1918

Commissioned

20 October 1919

Sunk by U-578

28 February 1942


USS Jacob Jones (DD-130) - History

Three-month old Jacob Jones locks through the Panama Canal in 1920. View this and five other images in detail.

Laid down 21 February 1918, launched 20 November and commissioned 20 October 1919, the new ship operated briefly in the Atlantic, then joined the Pacific Fleet in January 1920. Except for a period in reserve between August 1920 and June 1921, she was active along the West Coast until decommissioned and laid up in June 1922.

The &ldquoJakie&rdquo recommissioned in May 1930, one of 60 mothballed flush-deckers returned to service in a crash program to replace a like number of ships discovered to be unfit for active duty. Until the spring of 1933, she operated in the eastern Pacific with one tour in the Caribbean then moved permanently to the Atlantic.

Jacob Jones crossed the Atlantic in late 1938 to join Lisbon-based Squadron 40-T with four-stack cruiser Trenton and destroyer Badger. They operated &ldquoin the western Mediterranean for the purpose of cultivating friendly relations and protecting American interests,&rdquo but returned to the United States in October 1939 after World War II broke out the previous month.

The outbreak of World War II in Europe in 1939 signaled the beginning of a German submarine onslaught against transatlantic shipping&mdasha strategy first seen during World War I. By January 1942, the allies had adopted a preliminary answer: a convoy system with an acceptable level of protection, made possible by deploying every available escort vessel in this service. That month, transatlantic convoys lost only three merchant ships. Unprotected, however, was merchant shipping along America&rsquos East Coast.

&ldquoNo more perfect set-up for rapid and ruthless destruction could have been afforded the Nazi sea lords &hellip &lsquoThe massacre enjoyed by U-boats along our Atlantic Coast in 1942 was as much a national disaster as if saboteurs had destroyed half a dozen of our biggest war plants&rsquo.&rdquo
&mdash Morison

Commanding the Eastern Sea Frontier&mdasha territory from the Canadian border to Jacksonville, Florida and from the coast 200 miles seaward&mdashwas VAdm. Adolphus (&ldquoDolly&rdquo) Andrews, who commandeered every available cutter, patrol craft, armed trawler, yacht and patrol aircraft. But such resources&mdashon which the convoy system depended&mdashwer e scarce when Germany declared war on the United States on 11 December 1941. The next day, Hitler ordered a blitz against undefended east coast shipping known as Operation Paukenschlag (&ldquoDrumbeat&rdquo).

Six U-boats arrived off the East Coast in January 1942. There they began sinking merchant ships at the rate of one per day. Through April, as their numbers grew, U-boats sank 82 merchant ships in the Eastern Sea Frontier and 55 more in the Bermuda Area, none of which were in convoy.

Desperate, Admiral Andrews asked for fifteen destroyers and was allotted seven on temporary detail to conduct &ldquoroving patrols.&rdquo These proved ineffective&mdashJacob Jones became an immediate casualty and their only sinking was Roper&rsquos destruction of U-85 by gunfire in mid-April.

In May, however, with an adequate number of escorts available at last, the convoy system was adopted from Halifax to Key West and the number of losses dropped to five. As the preponderance of sinkings shifted south to the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean, June was the last month when more than six merchant ships were lost in the Eastern Sea Frontier.

Attached to Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 27, Jacob Jones was assigned with DesDiv 54 sisters Roper, Dickerson and Herbert to the Atlantic Coast Sound School on its reorganization at Key West, Florida in December 1940. During the next two years, she also participated in Neutrality Patrols off the East Coast and in the Caribbean area and, with the United States&rsquo entry into World War II in December 1941, commenced escorting convoys from Argentia, Newfoundland.

In February 1942, under the command of LCdr. Hugh D. Black and executive officer LCdr. Thomas W. Marshall, Jr., Jacob Jones became the first destroyer assigned to roving anti-submarine patrols off the East Coast. Even before clearing the New York entrance channel on her first such patrol, she contacted and attacked a U-boat. While an oil slick suggested success, postwar German records did not show any U-boat lost at that time.

Standing out of New York Harbor again on 27 February, the &ldquoJakie&rdquo was originally assigned to patrol between New Jersey&rsquos Barnegat Light and Five Fathom Bank off Cape May, then ordered south to the area off Cape May and the Delaware Capes. Enroute she encountered the drifting wreckage of the 7,451-ton tanker R. P. Resor, torpedoed that morning by U- 578. After pausing for two hours to search for survivors, she resumed her patrol to the southwest.

Before dawn the following morning, Jacob Jones herself encountered U-578, but without making contact. Without warning, two torpedoes hit her port side. One detonated her forward magazine, destroying everything and everyone forward of the No. 2 stack. The second hit astern, obliterating everything aft of the point of impact. There may have been a third.

Jacob Jones&rsquo casualties, 28 February 1942.

Source: Bureau of Personnel casualty report, NARA .

An estimated 30 officers and men abandoned ship. Depth charges exploded as she sank, however, killing many in the water&mdashnone of her seven officers and only eleven of her men survived. An army observation plane spotted her rafts and reported their position to Eagle 56 of the inshore patrol, which rescued survivors 4&ndash5 hours later and took them to Cape May.

In 1943, Fletcher-class destroyers Black (DD 666) and Marshall (DD 676) were named for her CO and XO and launched at Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey. The first Edsall-class destroyer escort laid down, DE 130, was also named Jacob Jones.

Today, Jacob Jones&rsquo remains lie at a depth of 120&ndash130 feet. Her bow and stern are destroyed but her midsection is recognizable, with boilers and turbines visible and torpedoes in their tubes.

Sources: Morison, Vol. I and X Roscoe Veigele, PC Patrol Craft of World War II Wilde.


New Jersey Scuba Diving

In the Panama Canal locks, 1920. Type: shipwreck, destroyer, Wickes / Tattnall class, U.S. Navy Built: 1919, Camden NJ USA Specs: ( 314 x 31 ft ) 1211 gross tons, 145 crew Sunk: Saturday February 28, 1942
torpedoed by U-578 – 134 casualties Depth: 120 ft Newly commissioned, circa 1919 Note the fine, yacht-like lines of the Wickes class
The approximate locations of the torpedo strikes are indicated

The Wickes class destroyer was an ambitious design for its day, combining high speed with heavy armament, but at a cost of range, handling, and sea-keeping. Nonetheless, they were generally considered satisfactory, and a great improvement over previous ships. Commonly known as “Flush Deckers” or “Four Stackers”, most were mothballed after World War I, only to be brought out again in the 1930s to replace newer ships of the derived Clemson class that had worn out prematurely. At this time, much of the armament was changed to give them better anti-aircraft and anti-submarine capabilities.

“Flush deck” refers to the main deck running in an uninterrupted straight line from bow to stern, unlike later designs that had raised bows or forecastles. The low bow made them very wet in rough seas. The narrow V-shaped stern and long narrow hull gave them a large turning radius. At least half of the internal space must have been dedicated to propulsion machinery to achieve the design speed of 35 knots, leaving little room for fuel, ammunition, stores and crew.

50 of these vessels were famously traded to England in the early stages of World War II in exchange for 99-year leases on military bases. Although they were used for convoy duty, their trans-Atlantic range was marginal, something that was eventually solved by at-sea replenishment. Many were converted to other uses, such as training, seaplane tenders, mine-laying and fast transport. Another famous incident involving “Flush Deckers” took place on September 8 1928, when seven destroyers ran at high speed onto the rocky coast near Santa Barbara California. Bad weather and bad navigation are blamed. All seven ships remain where they struck the area is now part of Vandenberg AFB. Several other Wickes-class ships are diveable off Southern California, sunk as targets or for filmmaking.

USS Jacob Jones – DD-130

CLASS – WICKES / TATTNALL ( as built )
Built to Bath plans by New York Shipbuilding

Displacement: 1,211 tons,
Dimensions: 314′ 5″ (oa) x 31′ 8″ x 9′ 10″ (Max)
Armament: 4 x 4″/50 guns, 2 x 3″/23AA guns, 12 x 21″ torpedo tubes
Machinery: 24,900 SHP direct drive turbines with geared cruising turbines, 2 screws
Speed: 35 Knots
Crew: 101

Launching of USS Jacob Jones, at New York Shipbuilding Co. shipyard, 20 Nov.1918

USS Jacob Jones, a 1211-ton Wickes class destroyer, was built Camden, New Jersey. After commissioning in October 1919 she operated briefly in the Atlantic, then transited the Panama Canal in January 1920 to join the Pacific Fleet. Except for a period in reserve between August 1920 and June 1921, the destroyer was active along the West Coast until she was decommissioned in June 1922.

During a general renewal of the Navy’s destroyer force, Jacob Jones was recommissioned in May 1930. She served in the eastern Pacific until March 1931, when she went to the Caribbean for maneuvers. Jacob Jones was again in the Pacific from early 1932 into the spring of 1933, but was thereafter stationed in the Atlantic area, where she was involved in tactical exercises, training duties and diplomatic missions. In October and November 1938 she crossed the Atlantic to operate in European waters and North African as part of Squadron 40-T. Jacob Jones returned to the United States in October 1939, shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War.

As rebuilt in the 1930s Jacob Jones tied-up next to brand-new aircraft carrier USS Yorktown

During the next two years, Jacob Jones took part in submarine support work, anti-submarine training, and Neutrality Patrols off the U.S. coast and in the Caribbean area. Upon the United States’ entry into World War II in December 1941, she began convoy escort operations out of Argentina, Newfoundland. She was assigned to anti-submarine patrols off the East Coast in February 1942, making one intense but inconclusive attack on a suspected submarine on the 22nd.

On the morning of 27 February, Jacob Jones departed New York harbor and steamed southward along the New Jersey coast to patrol and search the area between Barnegat Light and Five Fathom Bank. Shortly after her departure, she received orders to concentrate her patrol activity in waters off Cape May and the Delaware Capes. At 1530 she spotted the burning wreckage of tanker R.P. Resor, torpedoed the previous day east of Barnegat Light Jacob Jones circled the ship for 2 hours searching for survivors before resuming her southward course. Cruising at a steady 15 knots through calm seas, she last reported her position at 2000 and then commenced radio silence. A full moon lit the night sky and visibility was good throughout the night the ship, completely darkened without running or navigation lights showing, kept her southward course.

At the first light of dawn 28 February 1942, undetected German submarine U-578 fired a spread of torpedoes at the unsuspecting destroyer. The deadly “fish” sped unsighted and two “or possibly three” struck the destroyer’s port side in rapid succession.

According to her survivors, the first torpedo struck just aft of the bridge and caused almost unbelievable damage. Apparently, it exploded the ship’s magazine the resulting blast sheered off everything forward of the point of impact, destroying completely the bridge, the chart room, and the officers’ and petty officers’ quarters. As she stopped dead in the water, unable to signal a distress message, a second torpedo struck about 40 feet forward of the fantail and carried away the after part of the ship above the keel plates and shafts and destroyed the after crew’s quarters. Only the midships section was left intact.

All but 25 or 30 officers and men, including Lt. Comdr. Black, were killed by the explosions. The survivors, including a badly wounded, “practically incoherent” signal officer, went for the lifeboats. Oily decks, fouled lines and rigging, and the clutter of the ship’s strewn twisted wreckage hampered their efforts to launch the boats. Jacob Jones remained afloat for about 45 minutes, allowing her survivors to clear the stricken ship in four or five rafts. Within an hour of the initial explosion Jacob Jones plunged bow first into the cold Atlantic, as her shattered stern disappeared, her depth charges exploded, killing several survivors on a nearby raft.

The graceful stern was completely obliterated by the depth charges

At 0810 an Army observation plane sighted the life rafts and reported their position to Eagle 56 of the Inshore Patrol. By 1100, when strong winds and rising seas forced her to abandon her search, she had rescued 12 survivors, one of whom died en route to Cape May. The search for the other survivors of Jacob Jones continued by plane and ship for the next 2 days but none were ever found.

— from Navy historical records

Eagle 56 was later sunk by U-853 off Portland Maine.

While the Jacob Jones may have an interesting history, it is a good example that this does not always translate into a good dive. In fact, after a long boat ride, all you are likely to find is some low unidentifiable wreckage that could easily be an old barge, or anything. The ship was quite small and lightly constructed, and was devastated with multiple explosions during the sinking, breaking into two or more separated pieces. Nothing stands more than 3 or 4 feet above the bottom, although this could change with shifting sands.

Some protruding ribs are all that remains of the hull. These near the stern are part of a curved pattern that might be a fantail. A diver swims near the largest piece of wreckage. I think this may be a main reduction gear, with the core of the turbine in front of it, and a single long drive shaft behind. However, there should be two of these assemblies next to each other, not just one. The reduction gear again, from the side Cross-section of a Yarrow-type water tube boiler, with water tanks at each lower corner and steam tank at the top, interconnected by water tubes. The Jacob Jones was built with four boilers like this, but one was later removed, along with the corresponding stack. In addition, most of the heavy guns were removed, as were half of the torpedo tubes. All three boilers have collapsed. The steam tanks appear as big drums strewn in the sand, while the water tanks lie buried nearby, marked by bundles of water tubes. Each boiler trunked directly up into its own stack. This is an interesting object that might be a gun mount, or a searchlight, or maybe a driveshaft packing gland. Or something else entirely. A four inch shell. The brass casing is crushed from the pressure. It could still explode, even after all these years.

Gary Gentile gives a picturesque description of the wreck in his book Shipwrecks of Maryland and Delaware, including torpedo tubes, triangular swim-through boilers, and other highlights. Nothing like that remains. Except for the odd artillery shell, the Jacob Jones today is completely unremarkable. Visibility is generally very good, sometimes in excess of 100 ft, averaging 30 ft or so.

Type VIIc U-boat U-578, being rammed by a Russian patrol boat in 1941, sunk August 1942


After fitting out at Philadelphia, Jacob Jones sailed 4 December for shakedown in the Atlantic. She arrived Pensacola, Fla., 22 December to continue her training and departed 3 January 1920 for the Pacific. Arriving San Diego 26 January, she operated along the California coast on antiaircraft and firing exercises. She entered Mare Island Navy Yard 17 August for repairs and overhaul and assumed a reserve status. Returning to duty with Destroyer Force, Pacific Fleet, 18 June 1921, she operated out of San Diego until decommissioning 24 June 1922.

Recommissioned 1 May 1930, Jacob Jones trained in coastal waters from Alaska to Mexico as a plane guard for the Navy&rsquos budding aircraft carriers. Following Battle Fleet maneuvers during August, she entered Mare Island in November for repairs. The destroyer sailed 4 February 1931 for Panama, where she resumed plane guard duty for Langley (CV-1). Jacob Jones transited the Panama Canal 22 March and sailed for maneuvers in the Caribbean. She sailed for the United States 1 May and took part in joint Army-Navy maneuvers in the Chesapeake Bay 26 to 29 May. During the remainder of the summer, she operated with Destroyer Division 7 along the New England coast before retiring to the Boston Navy Yard 2 October for overhaul.

Jacob Jones steamed from Boston 1 December for maneuvers off Haiti. On 13 February 1932 she departed the Caribbean to begin 13 months of plane guard duty and torpedo practice along California. She returned to Guantánamo, Cuba, 1 May 1933 for general drill and battle problem exercises, and on the 26th she sailed for Norfolk to undergo self-upkeep on rotating reserve.

Following two months of overhaul at Charleston, Jacob Jones returned to Guantánamo 29 November for scouting and firing exercises. She interrupted her maneuvers 29 June 1934 and sailed for Port au Prince, Haiti, where she served as an escort during President Roosevelt&rsquos &ldquoGood Neighbor&rdquo visit to Haiti. She resumed Caribbean operations in July and participated in landing force exercises at Guantánamo during September. She retired from the Caribbean late in November and entered Norfolk Navy Yard 3 December 1934 for several months of upkeep.

In May 1935, Jacob Jones embarked midshipmen from the Naval Academy for an Atlantic training cruise. She returned to Norfolk 7 June for three months of coastal patrols and maneuvers. She steamed to New York in September to participate in destroyer maneuvers and operated out of New York until entering Brooklyn Navy Yard January 1936 for upkeep and inspection.

On 15 June 1936, Jacob Jones departed New York with reserve officers on board for training cruises in the Caribbean which continued through September. In October she participated in joint Army-Navy coastal maneuvers and, following her annual inspection at Norfolk, she participated in minesweeping training during February 1937. In March she trained officers of the Fifth Fleet Reserve and in June she resumed training cruises for midshipmen. She continued to operate as a practice ship for reserve officers until 15 January 1938, when she departed Norfolk for fleet landing exercises and battle maneuvers in waters off Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Jacob Jones returned to Norfolk 13 March for overhaul. In June she resumed operations out of Norfolk, serving as a carrier plane guard and conducting torpedo and gunnery practice.

After attending the Presidential Regatta in September, Jacob Jones prepared to sail for Europe to join Squadron 40-T in the Mediterranean. Organized in September 1936 to protect and evacuate Americans from Spain during the civil war, the squadron remained in the western Mediterranean cultivating friendly relations with European nations while protecting American interests. Departing Norfolk 26 October, Jacob Jones reached Gibraltar 6 November, and arrived Villefranche 17 November. She operated out of that French Mediterranean port on patrol until 20 March 1939. She visited Algiers 24 to 25 March 1939 and, during the next 7 months, steamed to various Atlantic European ports from Rotterdam to Lisbon. Departing Lisbon 4 October, she sailed for the United States and anchored at Norfolk the 14th.

Resuming her coastal operations, Jacob Jones conducted plane screening patrols from Norfolk to Newport, and in December she escorted Seadragon (SS-194) during the new submarine&rsquos Caribbean shakedown.

After two months of upkeep and inspection at Norfolk, Jacob Jones sailed for Charleston 4 April 1940 to join the Neutrality Patrol. Organized in September 1939 as a response to the war in Europe, the Neutrality Patrol was ordered to track and report the movements of any warlike operations of belligerents in the waters of the Western Hemisphere. The basic purpose of the patrol &ldquowas to emphasize the readiness of the United States Navy to defend the Western Hemisphere.&rdquo In June, after two months of duty with the Neutrality Patrol, Jacob Jones returned to training midshipmen.

In September, Jacob Jones departed Norfolk for New London, Conn., where her crew underwent intensive ASW sound school training. Returning briefly to Norfolk 6 December, she sailed to Key West for further ASW training. She resumed her operations with the Neutrality Patrol in March 1941, patrolling the waters from Key West to Yucatan Channel. In May she joined the ships which guarded the waters of Vichy-controlled islands, Martinique and Guadeloupe in the Lesser Antilles. Jacob Jones maintained her Caribbean operations throughout the summer.

On 30 September 1941 she departed Guantánamo with Destroyer Division 54 to prepare for escort duty in the North Atlantic. Jacob Jones received 2 months of upkeep and inspection at Norfolk and on 1 December 1941 departed for convoy escort training along the New England coast. Clearing Boston Harbor 12 December, she sailed to Argentia, Newfoundland, to begin her escort duty. On 16 December she escorted Mackerel (SS-204) and S-33 (SS-138) through heavy seas to Boston and returned to Argentia the 24th. Jacob Jones once again departed Argentia 4 January 1942 escorting Albatross (AM-71) and Linnet (AM-76). While steaming to join Convoy SC-63, bound for the British Isles, Jacob Jones made an underwater contact and commenced a depth charge attack. Losing contact with the submarine, she escorted her ships to the convoy and returned to Argentia 5 January.

Sailing from Argentia 14 January 1942, Jacob Jones joined Convoy HX-169, which was headed for Iceland. The convoy encountered a violent storm heavy seas and winds of force 9 scattered its ships&rsquo convoy. Separated from the convoy, Jacob Jones steamed independently for Hvalfjordur, Iceland. Though hampered by a shortage of fuel, an inoperable gyro compass, an erratic magnetic compass, and the continuous pounding of the storm, Jacob Jones arrived on the 19th. Five days later, she escorted three merchant ships to Argentia. Once again heavy seas and fierce winds separated the ships and Jacob Jones continued toward Argentia with one Norwegian merchantman. She detected and attacked another submarine 2 February 1942, but her depth charges yielded no visible results.

Arriving Argentia the 3d, she departed the following day and rejoined Convoy ON-59, bound for Boston. Reaching Boston 8 February, Jacob Jones received a week of repairs. She sailed on the 15th for Norfolk and 3 days later steamed from Norfolk to New York. In an effort to stem the losses to Allied merchant shipping along the Atlantic coast, Vice Admiral Adolphus Andrews, Commander of the Eastern Sea Frontier, established a roving ASW patrol. Jacob Jones, Lt. Comdr. Hugh P. Black in command, departed New York 22 February for this duty. While passing the swept channel off Ambrose Light Ship, Jacob Jones made a possible submarine contact and attacked immediately. For 5 hours Jacob Jones ran 12 attack patterns, dropping some 57 depth charges. Oil slicks appeared during the last six attacks but no other debris was detected. Having expended all her charges, Jacob Jones returned to New York to rearm. Subsequent investigation failed to reveal any conclusive evidence of a sunken submarine.

On the morning of 27 February, Jacob Jones departed New York harbor and steamed southward along the New Jersey coast to patrol and search the area between Barnegat Light and Five Fathom Bank. Shortly after her departure, she received orders to concentrate her patrol activity in waters off Cape May and the Delaware Capes. At 1530 she spotted the burning wreckage of tanker R. P. Resor, torpedoed the previous day east of Barnegat Light Jacob Jones circled the ship for two hours searching for survivors before resuming her southward course. Cruising at a steady 15 knots through calm seas, she last reported her position at 2000 and then commenced radio silence. A full moon lit the night sky and visibility was good throughout the night the ship, completely darkened without running or navigation lights showing, kept her southward course.

At the first light of dawn 28 February 1942, undetected German submarine U-578 fired a spread of torpedoes at the unsuspecting destroyer. The deadly &ldquofish&rdquo sped unsighted and two &ldquoor possibly three&rdquo struck the destroyer&rsquos port side in rapid succession.

According to her survivors, the first torpedo struck just aft of the bridge and caused almost unbelievable damage. Apparently, it exploded the ship&rsquos magazine the resulting blast sheered off everything forward of the point of impact, destroying completely the bridge, the chart room, and the officers&rsquo and petty officers&rsquo quarters. As she stopped dead in the water, unable to signal a distress message, a second torpedo struck about 40 feet forward of the fantail and carried away the after part of the ship above the keel plates and shafts and destroyed the after crew&rsquos quarters. Only the midships section was left intact.

All but 25 or 30 officers and men, including Lt. Comdr. Black, were killed by the explosions. The survivors, including a badly wounded, &ldquopractically incoherent&rdquo signal officer, went for the lifeboats. Oily decks, fouled lines and rigging, and the clutter of the ship&rsquos strewn twisted wreckage hampered their efforts to launch the boats. Jacob Jones remained afloat for about 45 minutes, allowing her survivors to clear the stricken ship in four or five rafts. Within an hour of the initial explosion Jacob Jones plunged bow first into the cold Atlantic as her shattered stern disappeared, her pressure-fuzed depth charges exploded, killing several survivors on a nearby raft.

At 0810 an Army observation plane sighted the life rafts and reported their position to Eagle 56 of the Inshore Patrol. By 1100, when strong winds and rising seas forced her to abandon her search, she had rescued 12 survivors, one of whom died en route to Cape May. The search for the other survivors of Jacob Jones continued by plane and ship for the next two days but none were ever found.


USS Jacob Jones DD-130 (1919-1942)

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USS Jacob Jones (DE-130), 1943-1973

USS Jacob Jones, a 1200-ton Edsall class escort ship built at Orange, Texas, was commissioned in April 1943. In July and August, following shakedown, she escorted a convoy across the Atlantic to North Africa, making one antisubmarine attack during the voyage. Jacob Jones was employed in convoy escort and patrol between the U.S. and the Mediterranean area for the rest of 1943. She served with the escort carrier Card (CVE-11) in January-March 1944, then began shepherding convoys across the North Atlantic to the United Kingdom and, later, to France. This duty lasted for the rest of the European war, with occasional breaks for shipyard work, training and patrol service.

In July 1945, Jacob Jones passed through the Panama Canal to join the war against Japan. However, that nation surrendered soon after the ship reached the Hawaiian Islands. After transporting personnel to the West Coast, she returned to the Atlantic in September to begin deactivation preparations. She was decommissioned in July 1946. After nearly three decades in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, initially at Green Cove Springs, Florida, and later at Orange, Texas, USS Jacob Jones was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in January 1971 and sold for scrapping in August 1973.

USS Jacob Jones was named in honor of Commodore Jacob Jones, USN, (1768-1850), a naval hero of the War of 1812.


ジェイコブ・ジョーンズ (DD-130)

1930年5月1日、ジェイコブ・ジョーンズは再就役し、アラスカからメキシコ沿岸にいたる海域で航空母艦の支援を兼ねて訓練を重ねた。8月に 戦闘艦隊 (英語版) の演習に参加し、演習後は11月に修理のためメア・アイランド海軍造船所に入った。修理が終わったあとの1931年2月4日からは、パナマに向かう空母ラングレー ( USS Langley, CV-1 ) とともに訓練航海を行う。3月22日にパナマ運河を東航してカリブ海に入り、演習に参加。5月1日にアメリカ本国に向かい、5月26日から29日にチェサピーク湾で行われた陸海軍合同演習に加わった。夏の間は第7駆逐部隊とともに行動し、10月2日からボストン海軍工廠でオーバーホールに入った。整備後は、ハイチ近海での演習に参加するため12月1日にボストンを出港。1932年2月13日には、カリフォルニア水域における13か月にわたる航空支援と雷撃演習に加わるためカリブ海を発つ。カリキュラムを消化したあと、ジェイコブ・ジョーンズは1933年5月1日にグアンタナモ湾に戻り、5月26日に整備を受けるためノーフォークに向かった。チャールストンでの2か月のオーバーホールののち、ジェイコブ・ジョーンズは発射訓練のために11月29日にグアンタナモ湾に戻った。1934年6月29日、ジェイコブ・ジョーンズは演習をいったん中止し、善隣外交の一環でポルトープランスを訪問するフランクリン・ルーズベルト大統領の乗艦の護衛を務める。7月にはカリブ海に戻って演習を再開し、9月にはグアンタナモ湾での上陸演習にも参加する。カリブ海での演習は11月下旬には終わり、1934年12月3日にノーフォーク海軍造船所に到着して数か月間整備を行った。

9月にルーズベルト大統領の巡視を受け、その後はヨーロッパに新設される第40戦隊に編入されて地中海方面を行動することとなった。戦隊の目的は、1936年7月に勃発したスペイン内戦からアメリカ国民を保護することであり、西地中海を主な行動範囲とした。ジェイコブ・ジョーンズは10月26日にノーフォークを出港し、11月6日にジブラルタルに到着、11月17日にフランスのヴィルフランシュ=シュル=メールに到着して任務を開始し、以降1939年3月20日にいたるまでフランス地中海艦隊の支援のもとで行動した。1939年3月24日から25日にかけてアルジェに寄港し、次の7か月の間にロッテルダムからリスボンまでのヨーロッパの主要港を訪問。10月4日にリスボンを出港し、10月14日にノーフォークに帰投した。帰投後はノーフォークとニューポート間で艦隊航空の支援を行い、12月には就役した新鋭潜水艦シードラゴン ( USS Seadragon, SS-194 ) の訓練を護衛した。

第二次世界大戦 編集

1939年9月に第二次世界大戦が勃発し、アメリカは当面参戦せず中立パトロールを開始する。中立パトロールでは、西半球のあらゆる海域における敵国の動向を監視し、報告する義務が与えられた。また同時に、「西半球を守るアメリカ海軍」の戦力を誇示する目的もあった。ジェイコブ・ジョーンズも中立パトロールに加わることとなり、2か月にわたるノーフォークでの整備後、哨戒のため1940年4月4日にチャールストンに向けて出港した。もっとも、2か月後には最初の哨戒を終え、士官候補生のための練習艦任務に戻った。9月にはコネチカット州ニューロンドンの音響学校のための訓練に供されるためノーフォークを出港し、ニューロンドンに向かう。12月6日に一時的にノーフォークに戻ったあと、フロリダ州キーウェストにおける音響訓練のため出港。訓練のあとは中立パトロールを再開、1941年3月からキーウェストとユカタン海峡間のカリブ海を哨戒する。5月からはヴィシー政権側の小アンティル諸島、グアドループおよびマルティニークに対する警戒任務を務め、夏の間はカリブ海で行動した。1940年12月、大西洋方面の旧型駆逐艦は兵装の更新改装が実施され、ジェイコブ・ジョーンズも工事が実施された [1] 。従来の4インチ砲と魚雷発射管の半数は撤去され、3インチ両用砲6門が4インチ砲と魚雷発射管の撤去跡に装備された [1] 。また機銃兵装と爆雷兵装も強化された [1] 。

1941年9月30日、ジェイコブ・ジョーンズは北大西洋での護衛任務のために編制された第54駆逐部隊に加わるため、グアンタナモ湾を出港。ノーフォークで2か月にわたり検査を受けたのち、1941年12月1日にノーフォークを出港してニューイングランド沿岸での船団護衛と訓練に従事する。12月12日に ボストン港 (英語版) を出港し、ニューファンドランド島 アルゼンチア海軍基地 (英語版) までの護衛を開始した。12月16日に潜水艦マッケレル ( USS Seadragon, SS-194 ) と S-33 (英語版) ( USS S-33, SS-138 ) の訓練を護衛したあとボストンを経由し、12月24日にアルゼンチアに戻った。

年明けて1942年1月4日、ジェイコブ・ジョーンズは掃海艇 アルバトロス (英語版) ( USS Albatross, AM-71 ) と リネット (英語版) ( USS Linnet, AM-76 ) を伴い、イギリス行のSC63船団を護衛するためアルゼンチアを出撃する。間もなく潜水艦を探知し、爆雷攻撃を行ったが接触を失い、護衛任務に戻ったあと1月5日にアルゼンチアに帰投した。一休息ののち、アイスランドに向かうIX169船団護衛のため1月14日にアルゼンチアを出撃。船団は途中、ビューフォート風力階級で風力9に相当する激しい嵐に遭遇し、船団加入各船は荒らしで散り散りとなってしまった。ジェイコブ・ジョーンズもまた船団から分離してしまったが、一路ハヴァルフィヨルドを目指した。嵐に加えて燃料の不足とジャイロコンパスと磁気コンパスの不具合に悩まされたものの、1月19日に到着することができた。5日後の1月24日、ジェイコブ・ジョーンズはアルゼンチアに向かう3隻の商船を護衛してハヴァルフィヨルドを出撃するが、帰路もまた嵐に見舞われ、1隻のノルウェー商船とともにアルゼンチアに到着した。2月2日には哨戒中に潜水艦を探知して爆雷攻撃を行ったものの、はっきりとした戦果にはならなかった。アルゼンチアには翌2月3日に到着し、間もなくON59船団護衛のため2月4日にはボストンに向けて出港した。ボストンには2月8日に到着したが、次の一週間は修理にあてられ、2月15日にノーフォークに向けて出港、3日後にはノーフォークからニューヨークに移動した。


Category: USS Jacob Jones (DD-130), United States Navy, World War II

Mission: Anti Sub Patrol Ship: USS Jacob Jones (DD 130) Loss Date: 28-Feb-42 Location: 38.37N, 74.32W - Grid CA 5458 Off the coast of Delaware Fate: Sunk by U-578 (Ernst-August Rehwinkel) Complement: 149 officers and men (138 dead and 11 survivors).


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December 6, 1917 – This Day During World War l – USS Jacob Jones is the first American destroyer to be sunk

December 6, 1917 – This Day During World War l – USS Jacob Jones is the first American destroyer to be sunk by enemy action when it is torpedoed by German submarine SM U-53. USS Jacob Jones (Destroyer No. 61/DD-61) was a Tucker-class destroyer built for the United States Navy prior to the American entry into World War I. The ship was the first U.S. Navy vessel named in honor of Jacob Jones. In early December 1917, Jacob Jones helped escort a convoy to Brest, France, with five other Queenstown-based destroyers. The last to depart from Brest on the return to Ireland, Jacob Jones was steaming alone in a zig-zag pattern when she was spotted by Kapitänleutnant Hans Rose on the German submarine U-53. At 16:20 on 6 December 1917, near position 49°23′N 6°13′W lookouts on Jacob Jones spotted a torpedo 800 yards (730 m) distant headed for the ship’s starboard side. Despite having her rudder put hard left and emergency speed rung up, Jacob Jones was unable to move out of the way, and the torpedo struck her rudder. Even though the depth charges did not explode, Jacob Jones was adrift. The jolt had knocked out power, so the destroyer was unable to send a distress signal since she was steaming alone, no other ship was present to know of Jacob Jones’ predicament. Commander David W. Bagley, the destroyer’s commander, ordered all life rafts and boats launched. He then ordered Jacob Jones to be scuttled, knowing that the ship’s cargo of depth charges, set on “ready”, the ship began to sink by the stern after the scuttling charges were activated, the ship would probably detonate at any moment. As the ship continued to sink, her bow raised in the air almost vertically before she began to slip beneath the waves. At this point the depth charges began exploding, killing a number of men who had been able to escape the destroyer, and stunning many others in the water. The destroyer, the first United States destroyer ever lost to enemy action, sank eight minutes after the torpedo struck the rudder, taking with her two officers and 64 men. In the water, several of the crew — most notably Lieutenant, junior grade, Stanton F. Kalk, the officer-of-the-deck when the torpedo struck — began to get men out of the water and into the life rafts. Kalk worked in the cold Atlantic water to equalize the load among the various rafts, but died of exhaustion and exposure. Bagley noted in his official account that about 30 minutes after Jacob Jones sank, the German submarine surfaced about two to three miles from the collection of rafts and took one of the American sailors on board. According to Uboat.net, what Rose of U-53 had done was surface and take aboard two badly injured American sailors. Rose had also radioed the American base at Queenstown with the approximate coordinates of the sinking before departing the area.
Bagley, unaware of Rose’s humanitarian gesture, left most of the food, water, and medical supplies with Lieutenant Commander John K. Richards, whom he left in charge of the assembled rafts. Bagley, Lieutenant Commander Norman Scott (Jacob Jones’ executive officer) and four crewmen (brought along to row), set out for aid in the nearby Isles of Scilly. At 13:00 on 7 December, Bagley’s group was sighted by a British patrol vessel just six nautical miles (11 km) from their destination. The group was relieved to find that the British sloop HMS Camellia had found and taken aboard most of the survivors earlier that morning a small group had been rescued on the night of the sinking by the American steamer Catalina. Several men were recognized for their actions in the aftermath of the torpedo attack. Kalk (posthumously) and Bagley received the Navy Distinguished Service Medal. Others honored included Chief Boatswain’s Mate Harry Gibson (posthumously) and Chief Electrician’s Mate L. J. Kelly, who both received the Navy Cross and Richards, Scott, and Chief Boatswain’s Mate Charles Charlesworth all received letters of commendation.
USS Jacob Jones DD-61